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NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CULTURAL PROPERTY PROTECTION

CONTENT

2015 CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Dennis Ahern

Dennis Ahern

Art Under Attack
Thursday, March 26
5:30 p.m.

Dennis Ahern is the Head of Safety, Security and Services for Tate. He has a wide remit involving planning the risk strategies for the protection of artworks, fire safety, public safety, logistics and licensing issues. He has held the position at Tate since 2000, following service with Her Majesty's Armed Forces as a service policeman, and a period of head of security for a five-star hotel chain. Dennis presents internationally on managing risk in the cultural environment. He is a trustee of the association for research into crimes against art, and a member of the International Committee on Museum Security.

Kristina Anderson

The Things Headlines Don't Tell Us: Lessons Learned as a Survivor of the Virginia Tech Shooting
Thursday, March 26
2 p.m.

Kristina Anderson is a survivor of the Virginia Tech tragedy and the founder of Koshka Foundation for Safe Schools, a non-profit which creates resources and content for raising the level of awareness toward campus safety for students, parents and educators. The foundation also works to provide resources and support for survivors of trauma.

Kristina started the non-profit after surviving the worst school shooting committed by a single perpetrator on April 16th, 2007. Kristina was shot 3 times during the Virginia Tech shooting - twice in her back and once in her toe - while attending an Intermediate French class. She became one of the most critically injured survivors with the largest number of casualties in her classroom.

Thanks to a genius surgeon, strong family, and an immense outpouring of support, Kristina made a full recovery and proudly returned to Virginia Tech to finish her degree in International Studies and Foreign Languages.

As her perspective on life has significantly changed, Kristina travels extensively for trainings and presentations on emergency preparedness, safety, and motivational speaking with law enforcement and corporate audiences. Ms. Anderson is also co-founder of LiveSafe, a personal safety mobile application that promotes a crowd sourced approach in preventing crime.

The name of Kristina's foundation (pronounced co-shhh-ca) translates to "Little Kitten" in Russian, a nod to her Russian mother's nickname for her growing up.

Robert Carotenuto

Trends in Cultural Property Protection
Friday, March 27
9 a.m.

Robert A. Carotenuto, CPP, PCI, PSP is Associate Vice President for Security at The New York Botanical Garden. Prior to joining The Garden in 2010, he was a member of The Metropolitan Museum of Art Security team for sixteen years, serving as Associate Security Manager for Physical Security and Emergency Operations from 2004 to 2010. He is the ASIS Cultural Properties Council Vice Chair and serves as Security Committee Chair for the American Alliance of Museums. Robert holds an MS in Protection Management from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, where is currently an Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Security, Fire, and Emergency Management, and an MS in Computer Information Systems from Baruch College.

Robert Combs

Robert Combs

The Year-in-Review
Thursday, March 26
9:30 a.m.

Bob Combs has been with the Getty since 1986. He served for a number of years as Manager of Technical Systems and was responsible for the design and implementation of security and fire safety systems at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa In 2000, he was promoted to Director of Security for The J. Paul Getty Trust and in 2011 added responsibility for the Visitor Services Department. He manages a proprietary staff of several hundred security and visitor services professionals responsible for security, life safety, technical systems, transportation, visitor services, call center, box office, and parking operations.

A native of Chicago, Combs also previously served as Associate Director of Security at the Art Institute of Chicago, from 1979 through 1986. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Management from the University of Redlands, and a Masters in Business Administration (MBA) from the Anderson School at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

Kinshasha Holman Conwill

Update: National Museum of African American History and Culture
Thursday, March 26
4:30 p.m.

Kinshasha Holman Conwill is Deputy Director of the National Museum of African American History & Culture, Smithsonian Institution. Prior to joining NMAAHC she was an arts, museum, and management consultant where her projects included acting as senior policy advisor for the Museums and Community Initiative of the American Association of Museums, project director for the New York City Creative Communities program of LINC (Leveraging Investments in Creativity), project director and managing editor for Culture Counts: Strategies for a More Vibrant Cultural Life for New York City (New York Foundation for the Arts), and project manager for Creative Downtown: The Role of Culture in Rebuilding Lower Manhattan (New York City Arts Coalition).

She was director of The Studio Museum in Harlem from 1988 to 1999 where she conceptualized, organized, or co-organized more than 40 major exhibitions, many of which traveled nationally. She also served as assistant exhibit coordinator for the Museum of the American Indian in New York City and Coordinator of Activities for the Frank Lloyd Wright Hollyhock House.

Conwill writes on art, museums, and cultural policy and is a frequent lecturer and panelist at colleges, universities, conferences, and museums. She has served as an advisor for the Harvard University Program for Art Museum Directors and on the faculties of the Virginia Management Institute for Senior Museum Professionals and the Salzburg Seminars. Additionally, she has been a presenter in major international art conferences and meetings and a juror for numerous public art projects and exhibitions.

A native of Atlanta, Georgia, she attended Mount Holyoke College as a National Achievement Scholar, graduated magna cum laude from Howard University with a B.F.A., and received an M.B.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Lori Foley

Protecting & Preserving Our Cultural Heritage: Creating Sustainable Relationships through Collaboration
Thursday, March 26
3:30 p.m.

Lori Foley is Vice President of Emergency Programs at Heritage Preservation. Her responsibilities include coordinating national programs on cultural heritage and disaster management, including Alliance for Response. She is also the director of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force, a partnership of 42 national service organizations and federal agencies that is co-sponsored by Heritage Preservation and FEMA. When a disaster occurs anywhere in the US, the Task Force is poised to help connect affected cultural institutions with the resources they need to respond to and recover from the disaster. Prior to joining Heritage Preservation in 2011, Lori was the Director of Preservation Services at the Northeast Document Conservation Center. Lori is a member of the cooperative disaster network COSTEP Massachusetts, which evolved from the 2003 Alliance for Response Boston forum; a past co-chair of the Emergency Committee of the American Institute for Conservation (AIC); a member of the AIC Collections Emergency Response Team (AIC-CERT); and a member of her town’s Archives Advisory Council.

Doug Hall

Doug Hall

Benchmarking Study of Museum Staffing
Friday, March 27
10 a.m.

Doug Hall is a physical security specialist and security engineer with over 27 years of experience in the fields of physical security, risk management, security design, construction and emergency/disaster management. Mr. Hall has held several positions with the Smithsonian Institution but currently serves as Deputy Director, Office of Protection Services (OPS), where he is responsible for the Smithsonian’s physical security, anti-terrorism, personnel security, credentialing, and risk management programs; and all business and administrative operations for OPS. He is also currently Chair of the Federal Facilities Council Standing Committee on Physical Security and Hazard Mitigation and Chair of the Museum Committee of the Cultural Properties Council of ASIS International.

Chief Cathy Lanier

A look back at the Navy Yard shooting
Thursday, March 26
1 p.m.

The cornerstone of Metropolitan Police Department Chief of Police Cathy L. Lanier's leadership lies in her commitment to reducing violent crimes through the strong relationships she has fostered with partners in community as well as those within the criminal justice system. A key to this success was convincing all partners that we could prevent the next homicide through immediate and coordinated action. Strengthened police-community ties have opened avenues of communications, giving victims and witnesses the courage to share valuable information that helps the MPD capture criminals.

Lanier has spent her entire law enforcement career with the Metropolitan Police Department, beginning in 1990. After assuming leadership of the Metropolitan Police Department on January 2, 2007, Cathy L. Lanier was unanimously confirmed as the Chief of Police by the Council of the District of Columbia on April 3, 2007.

Chief Lanier is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and the federal Drug Enforcement Administration's Drug Unit Commanders Academy. She holds Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Management from Johns Hopkins University, and a Master's Degree in National Security Studies from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. She is certified at the technician level in Hazardous Materials Operations.

For a detailed bio, please see DC.gov.

Steve Layne

Trends in Cultural Property Protection
Friday, March 27
9 a.m.

Steve Layne, CPP, CIPM, CIPI is CEO for Layne Consultants International. He is the Founding Director of the International Foundation for Cultural Property Protection (IFCPP). Steve is a former police chief, public safety director, and security director. He authored Safeguarding Cultural Properties and The Business Survival Guide. He co-authored Suggested Guidelines for Museum Security. He produces video training programs for security officers, and security managers. Steve serves as a keynoter and seminar leader at numerous conferences and professional gatherings. He has instructed at the Colorado Law Enforcement Training Academy, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, National Crime Prevention Institute, Colorado Mountain College, the University of Louisville and ASIS Assets Protection I and II. He is a graduate of the FBI's Police Management Program.

Herb Lottier

International Committee on Museum Security (ICMS); We Exist to Serve
Friday, March 27
9:40 a.m.

Herb Lottier, CPP has served as Director of Protection Services at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the 4th largest Art Museum in the United States, since 1996. He administers 35 proprietary supervisors and 175 contract officers and secures seven buildings including two art storage facilities.

Prior to his selection as Director of Protection Services, Herb served in the Philadelphia Police Department for 21 years. His most rewarding Command assignment was as a Captain in the S.W.A.T. Unit responsible for addressing hostage takers, barricaded incidents, and high risk warrant service.

Herb now finds his greatest challenge to be the never ending search for cost saving initiatives in his security department. He longs for the much easier days of confronting an armed felon.

Bonnie Magness-Gardiner

FBI Art Crime Team: 10 Years and Counting
In tandem with the Year-in-Review
Thursday, March 26
9:30 a.m.

Bonnie Magness-Gardiner is Program Manager of the Art Theft Program at FBI headquarters in Washington, DC. She manages the National Stolen Art File and provides support for the Art Crime Team, fifteen special agents investigating cultural property cases in the U.S. and abroad.

Dr. Magness-Gardiner received a PhD in Near Eastern Archaeology from the University of Arizona (1987). After teaching archaeology for five years at Bryn Mawr College, she entered government service as program manager for the Archaeology Program at the National Endowment for the Humanities then became a program manager for the American Memory Project at the Library of Congress.

For eight years she was the Senior Cultural Property Analyst for the Department of State, implementing the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property. She served as the program manager for cultural heritage restoration projects in Iraq. Since June 2005, she has been with the FBI.

Scott Merritt

Protecting & Preserving Our Cultural Heritage: Creating Sustainable Relationships through Collaboration
Thursday, March 26
3:30 p.m.

Scott Merritt is currently Deputy Assistant Director at the National Museum of the American Indian New York, responsible for operations and program support. His Smithsonian career started 23 years ago in the art conservation department before taking on the role of Collections Manager when he developed and implemented a plan to relocate the NMAI 850,000 object collection from New York to Washington D.C. The Move effort required an extraordinary collaboration between the NMAI Move Team and SI Offices of Protective Services and Risk Management. As head of Operations in NY he oversaw the development of the museum’s emergency management plan, the Landlords building-wide plan and became active in the Alliance for Response-NY about a year before Super storm Sandy. He currently chairs the AfR-NY committee responsible for establishing the organizations new organizational and governance structure.

Sheila Palmer

Protecting & Preserving Our Cultural Heritage: Creating Sustainable Relationships through Collaboration
Thursday, March 26
3:30 p.m.

Sheila is currently a Senior Risk Control Engineer for Chubb’s Loss Control Department. She is based out of the New York City branch. She is responsible for providing technical leadership in the area of loss prevention for museums and cultural institution. She has provided technical presentations on loss prevention topics to the Museum Library and Cultural Properties facility Group of Greater New York City. She served as a moderator of a panel discussion on risk management for the Alliance for Response forum sponsored by the Heritage Emergency Task forum. She has presented at the AAM professional conference and conference for cultural institution security managers on risk assessments for collections.

She is a founding member and on the steering committee for the New York Alliance for Response, Heritage Preservation. A professional group dedicated to enhancing the ability of cultural institutions ability to prevent, plan and recover from emergencies.

Thomas Slade

Thomas Slade

Collection Vulnerabilities: Deterring Insider Theft or Damage by Raising Risk of Detection
Friday, March 27
11 a.m.

Thomas Slade is the Senior Director of Security and Safety, at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. He is responsible for maintaining a safe and secure environment for more than 1,000 full- and part-time staff and approximately 4 million visitors each year. He oversees a Security staff of more than 200 persons, and provides patrol, and investigative services, emergency management and disaster response, risk assessment and security systems services.

Robert Waller

Working together to reduce risk
Friday, March 27
11 a.m.

Robert Waller is President and Senior Risk Analyst with Protect Heritage Corp., a firm dedicated to helping institutions and organizations improve heritage management. His career included 33 years with the Canadian Museum of Nature. He holds a Ph.D. in Cultural Property Risk Analysis from Göteborg University. Robert Waller has taught, lectured, and served as a consultant at museums and universities throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and Australasia. He is professionally accredited by CAPC and a fellow of IIC.

Corine Wegener

Worst Case: Protecting Museums and Collections during Armed Conflict
Thursday, March 26
11 a.m.

Corine Wegener is Cultural Heritage Preservation Officer in the Office of the Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture at the Smithsonian Institution where she coordinates the Smithsonian’s response to cultural heritage disasters.

Before her arrival at the Smithsonian, Wegener was associate curator in the department of Decorative Arts, Textiles, and Sculpture at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. In her concurrent Army Reserve career, she served as a Civil Affairs officer, including Arts, Monuments, and Archives Officer for the 352d Civil Affairs Command in Baghdad, Iraq, 2003-2004.

Her recent Smithsonian projects include assistance for cultural heritage in New York after Hurricane Sandy and emergency training workshops for cultural heritage professionals from Mali, Syria, and Egypt. Wegener is founder and past president of the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield and Chair of the ICOM Disaster Relief for Museums Task Force. She holds a B.G.S from the University of Nebraska-Omaha and M.A. degrees in Art History and Political Science from the University of Kansas.

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